A Single Man

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A Single Man
by Christopher Isherwood
Difficulty: Easy
Amazon, Barnes and Noble

Normally I write my own summaries for these posts, but I like blurb from the Farrar, Straus and Giroux edition too much:

“Welcome to sunny suburban 1960s Southern California. George is a gay middle-aged English professor, adjusting to solitude after the tragic death of his young partner. He is determined to persist in the routines of his former life. A Single Man follows him over the course of an ordinary twenty-four hours. Behind his British reserve, tides of grief, rage, and loneliness surge―but what is revealed is a man who loves being alive despite all the everyday injustices.”

Christopher Isherwood is best known for his novel Goodbye to Berlin, which, through a series of adaptations, eventually became the famous musical Cabaret, but he is also, in my opinion, one of the most interesting and talented English writers of the 20th century. Isherwood seems to have known almost everyone who was anyone in the english literary world, and slept with half of them. He travelled extensively around Europe, barely escaping Germany before the start of WWII, before finally emigrating to the United States where he lived with his lover, Don Bachardy, until he died in 1986.

When it came to writing, Isherwood was an exacting craftsman, and A Single Man may very well be the most skillfully composed of all the books that have or will appear on this website. In fewer than 200 pages of accessible, insightful, and dignified prose, Isherwood depicts a day in a life, not of a gay man, but simply of a man. He does so with quiet pride, never apologizing to or asking forgiveness or even mercy from, a disapproving society. A Single Man is about age, grief, sexuality, culture, and time, but more than anything it is a contemplation of life as an outsider.

Fun fact: Isherwood and the poet W.H. Auden were lifelong besties and slept together on and off for pretty much their entire lives. They was bangin’, a lot.

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Isherwood (left) and Auden (right)

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